MY PAYING ADS

Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Trib: Chicago bar ignores smoking ban


>>>Sabrina Lockett, a veteran restaurant worker with asthma, said she lost a friend to cancer, and he didn't smoke. She said she regretted that all bars don't follow the law. "I wished it was passed sooner," she said, saying the law may have saved her friend's life.

So lemme get dis straight. A lady believes SHS in bars is what caused her friend to get the LC and of course die.

When a nonsmoker dies from LC, juz blame it on SHS in a bar. Dat logic is full of sh1t. And if anyone wants to talk about saving lives in public, I think a smoke-filled bar should be a nonsmoker's least worry.

I AM confident SHS in a bar didn't cause dat chick's friend to get LC.

(*****************************************************
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/chi-smoking-bars-25-nov25,0,5531427.story

The air was hazy and the ashtrays were full on a recent night at the Crowbar Inc. tavern on the Southeast Side, despite Illinois' nearly 2-year-old indoor smoking ban.

Patrons say they like it that way. They're even willing to pay a little extra to light up.

Owner Pat Carroll said his customers -- smokers and nonsmokers alike -- contribute to a "smoking fund" canister that often sits on the bar, to subsidize the fines he's incurred for flouting the law.

Carroll said he's been ticketed twice and paid at least $680. He fears that if he forbids smoking, his cigar-and-cigarette crowd would switch to bars that permit smoking just a few blocks away in Indiana.

"So guess what, everybody can smoke in here," he said, fingering a lit cigarette balanced on an ashtray. "I'm not losing my customers."

The Tribune and WGN-TV found patrons smoking at several Chicagoland bars, defying the Smoke-free Illinois Act that has prohibited smoking inside public places since Jan. 1, 2008.

Bar patrons and owners seen smoking indoors had varying explanations for ignoring the law. At Boem Restaurant in Albany Park, where one visit found the room filled with smoke, the bar's owner said the place was booked for a private party, which exempted it from the law. But it doesn't, officials say.

The public can lodge complaints against establishments that skirt the law, triggering a site inspection. Violators face fines that can grow steeper with each infraction, starting at $250 for a business and $100 for an individual smoker.

"We think it would become very expensive to continue to rack up fines," said Kelly Jakubek, spokeswoman for the Illinois Department of Public Health. "That would become very burdensome."

Health officials say smoking-ban scofflaws are the exception and that indoor smoking in public has drastically decreased over the last two years. Jakubek added that she hopes Indiana and other states that allow indoor smoking in public places pass a ban similar to the one in Illinois, evening the field for competitive business owners such as Carroll.

"There are always some bad apples out there who will try to get around the law," said Tim Hadac, spokesman for the Chicago Department of Public Health. "If you look at the big picture, compliance is widespread."

For example, in Chicago, which has its own smoking ban similar to the state law, an accused violator gets several warning letters, then an inspection. Last year, there were 603 complaints and 24 inspections, which led to nine tickets. So far this year, those numbers were down to 286 complaints and 18 inspections, resulting in four tickets, Hadac said.

He said data showed warning letters generally spurred compliance.

Soon "it will be as socially unacceptable and even unthinkable to smoke in a bar or restaurant as it currently is in a movie theater," he said in an e-mail.

Katie Lorenz of the American Lung Association in Greater Chicago said she was disappointed that some bars weren't complying; she added that the secondhand smoke harms employees and non-smoking patrons. "This is a health issue, and it affects every single person who happens to be in the bar," she said. "What's in the best interest of everyone is to not inhale those toxic fumes."

Sabrina Lockett, a veteran restaurant worker with asthma, said she lost a friend to cancer, and he didn't smoke. She said she regretted that all bars don't follow the law. "I wished it was passed sooner," she said, saying the law may have saved her friend's life.

But some smokers say they'll support any tavern that gives them sanctuary. Laura Pugh said she contributes $5 a month to Crowbar's smoking fund, considering it akin to membership fees at a private club. If she couldn't smoke there, Pugh said she'd probably go to a bar in Indiana.

"I respect Illinois law," she said. "However, I feel that if an Illinois bar wants to allow smoking, there should never be a problem if it's willing to abide by the fine."

Monday, November 23, 2009

How to FAX the Senators

I heard some smokers are faxing the sigs from the Citizens Against the PACT Act petition EVERY NIGHT to the Senators. If you wanna know how to FAX any U.S. Senator, here's a list of fax numbas I found.

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Alabama
Gov. Bob Riley (R) 334-242-7100
State Legislature Links
Sen. Jeff Sessions (R) Fax: 202-224-3149
Sen. Richard C. Shelby (R) Fax: 202-224-3416
Rep. Jo Bonner (R-1) Fax: 202-225-0562
Rep. Bobby Bright (D-2) Fax: 202-225-8913
Rep. Michael Rogers (R-3) Fax: 202-226-8485
Rep. Robert Aderholt (R-4) Fax: 202-225-5587
Rep. Parker Griffith (D-5) Fax: 202-225-4392
Rep. Spencer Bachus (R-6) Fax: 202-225-2082
Rep. Artur Davis (D-7) Fax: 202-226-9567

Alaska
Gov. Sean Parnell (R) 907-465-3500
State Legislature Links
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R) Fax: 202-224-5301
Sen. Mark Begich (D) Fax: 202-224-2354
Rep. Don Young (R-At Large) Fax: 202-225-0425

Arizona
Gov. Jan Brewer (R) 602-542-4331
State Legislature Links
Arizona Constitution
Sen. Jon Kyl. (R) Fax: 202-224-2207
Sen. John McCain (R) Fax: 202-228-2862
Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick (D-1) Fax: 202-226-9739
Rep. Trent Franks (R-2) Fax: 202-225-6328
Rep. John Shadegg (R-3) Fax: 202-225-3462
Rep. Ed Pastor (D-4) Fax: 202-225-1655
Rep. Harry Mitchell (D-5) Fax: 202-225-3263
Rep. Jeff Flake (R-6) Fax: 202-226-4386
Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-7) Fax: 202-225-1541
Rep. Gabrielle Giffords (D-8) Fax: 202-225-0378

Arkansas
Gov. Mike Beebe (D) 501-682-2345
State Legislature Links
Sen. Blanche Lincoln (D) Fax: 202-228-1371
Sen. Mark Pryor (D) Fax: 202-228-0908
Rep. Marion Berry (D-1) Fax: 202-225-5602
Rep. Vic Snyder (D-2) Fax: 202-225-5903
Rep. John Boozeman (R-3) Fax: 202-225-5713
Rep. Mike Ross (D-4) Fax: 202-225-1314

California
Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Fax: 916-558-3160
State Legislature Links
Sen. Barbara Boxer (D) Fax: 415-956-6701
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D) Fax: 202-228-3954
Rep. Mike Thompson (D-1) Fax: 202-225-4335
Rep. Wally Herger (R-2) Fax: 202-225-1740
Rep. Dan Lungren (R-3) Fax: 202-226-1298
Rep. Tom McClintock (R-4) Fax: 202-225-5444
Rep. Doris Matsui (D-5) Fax: 202-225-0566
Rep. Lynn Woolsey (D-6) Fax: 202-225-5163
Rep. George Miller (D-7) Fax: 202-225-5609
Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-8) Fax: 202-225-8259
Non Constituent email address for Speaker Pelosi.
Rep. Barbara Lee (D-9) Fax: 202-225-9817
Rep. John Garamendi (D-10) Fax: 202-225-5914
Rep. Jerry McNerney (D-11) Fax: 202-226-0861
Rep. Jackie Speier (D-12) Fax: 202-226-4183
Rep. Pete Stark (D-13) Fax: 202-226-3805
Rep. Anna Eshoo (D-14) Fax: 202-225-8890
Rep. Mike Honda (D-15) Fax: 202-225-2699
Rep. Zoe Lofgren (D-16) Fax: 202-225-3336
Rep. Sam Farr (D-17) Fax: 202-225-6791
Rep. Dennis Cardoza (D-18) Fax: 202-225-0819
Rep. George Radanovich (R-19) Fax: 202-225-3402
Rep. Jim Costa (D-20) Fax: 202-225-9308
Rep. Devin Nunes (R-21) Fax: 202-225-3404
Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-22) Fax: 202-225-8798
Rep. Lois Capps (D-23) Fax: 202-225-5632
Rep. Elton Gallegly (R-24) Fax: 202-225-1100
Rep. Howard McKeon (R-25) Fax: 202-225-0683
Rep. David Dreier (R-26) Fax: 202-225-7018
Rep. Brad Sherman (D-27) Fax: 202-225-5879
Rep. Howard Berman (D-28) Fax: 202-225-3196
Rep. Adam Schiff (D-29) Fax: 202-225-5828
Rep. Henry Waxman (D-30) Fax: 202-225-4099
Rep. Xavier Becerra (D-31) Fax: 202-225-2202
Rep. Judy Chu (D-32) Fax: 202-225-5467
Rep. Diane Watson (D-33) Fax: 202-225-2422
Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard (D-34) Fax: 202-226-0350
Rep. Maxine Waters (D-35) Fax: 202-225-7854
Rep. Jane Harman (D-36) Fax: 202-226-7290
Rep. Laura Richardson (D-37) Fax: 202-225-7926
Rep. Grace Napolitano (D-38) Fax: 202-225-0027
Rep. Linda Sanchez (D-39) Fax: 202-225-5859
Rep. Ed Royce (R-40) Fax: 202-226-0335
Rep. Jerry Lewis (R-41) Fax: 202-225-6498
Rep. Gary Miller (R-42) Fax: 202-226-6962
Rep. Joe Baca (D-43) Fax: 202-225-8671
Rep. Ken Calvert (R-44) Fax: 202-225-2004
Rep. Mary Bono (R-45) Fax: 202-225-2961
Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-46) Fax: 202-225-0145
Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-47) Fax: 202-225-5859
Rep. John Campbell (R-48) Fax: 202-225-9177
Rep. Darrell Issa (R-49) Fax: 202-225-3303
Rep. Brian Bilbray (R-50) Fax: 202-225-2558
Rep. Bob Filner (D-51) Fax: 202-225-9073
Rep. Duncan Hunter (R-52) Fax: 202-225-0235
Rep. Susan Davis (D-53) Fax: 202-225-2948

Colorado
Gov. Bill Ritter (D) 303-866-2471
State Legislature Links
Sen. Mark Udall (D) Fax: 202-224-6471
Sen. Michael Bennet (D) Fax: 202-224-1933
Rep. Diana DeGette (D-1) Fax: 202-225-5657
Rep. Jared Polis (D-2) Fax: 202-226-7840
Rep. John Salazar (D-3) Fax: 202-226-9669
Rep. Betsy Markey (D-4) Fax: 202-225-5870
Rep. Doug Lamborn (R-5) Fax: 202-225-1942
Rep. Mike Coffman (R-6) Fax: 202-226-4623
Rep. Ed Perlmutter (D-7) Fax: 202-225-5278

Connecticut
Gov. Jodi Rell (R) 860-566-4840
State Legislature Links
Sen. Christopher Dodd (D) Fax: 202-224-1083
Sen. Joseph Lieberman (D) Fax: 202-224-9750
Rep. John Larson (D-1) Fax: 202-225-1031
Rep. Joe Courtney (D-2) Fax: 202-225-4977
Rep. Rosa DeLauro (D-3) Fax: 202-225-4890
Rep. Jim Himes (D-4) Fax: 202-225-9629
Rep. Chris Murphy (D-5) Fax: 202-225-4488

Delaware
Gov. Jack Markell (D) 302-739-4101
State Legislature Links
Sen. Edward Kaufman (D) Fax:
Sen. Tom Carper (D) Fax: 202-228-2190
Rep. Michael Castle (R-At Large) Fax: 202-225-2291

Florida
Gov. Charlie Crist (R) 850-488-4441
State Legislature Links
Sen. George LeMieux (R) Fax: 202-224-2237
Sen. Bill Nelson (D) Fax: 202-228-2183
Rep. Jeff Miller (R-1) Fax: 202-225-3414
Rep. F. Allen Boyd (D-2) Fax: 202-225-5615
Rep. Corrine Brown (D-3) Fax: 202-225-2256
Rep. Ander Crenshaw (R-4) Fax: 202-225-2504
Rep. Virginia Brown-Waite (R-5) Fax: 202-226-6559
Rep. Cliff Stearns (R-6) Fax: 202-225-3973
Rep. John Mica (R-7) Fax: 202-226-0821
Rep. Alan Grayson (D-8) Fax: 202-225-0999
Rep. Gus Bilirakis (R-9) Fax: 202-225-4085
Rep. Bill Young (R-10) Fax: 202-225-9764
Rep. Kathy Castor (D-11) Fax: 202-225-5652
Rep. Adam Putnam (R-12) Fax: 202-225-0585
Rep. Vern Buchanan (R-13) Fax: 202-226-0828
Rep. Connie Mack (R-14) Fax: 202-225-6820
Rep. Bill Posey (R-15) Fax: 202-225-3516
Rep. Tom Rooney (D-16) Fax: 202-225-3132
Rep. Kendrick Meek (D-17) Fax: 202-226-0777
Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-18) Fax: 202-225-5620
Rep. Robert Wexler (D-19) Fax: 202-225-5974
Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-20) Fax: 202-225-8456
Rep. Lincoln Diaz-Balart (R-21) Fax: 202-225-8576
Rep. Ron Klein (D-22) Fax: 202-225-8398
Rep. Alcee Hastings (D-23) Fax: 202-225-1171
Rep. Suzanne Kosmas (D-24) Fax: 202-226-6299
Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (R-25) Fax: 202-226-0346

Georgia
Gov. Sonny Perdue (R) 404-656-1776
State Legislature Links
Sen. Saxby Chamblis (R) Fax 202-224-0103
Sen. Johnny Isakson (R) Fax: 202-228-2090
Rep. Jack Kingston (R-1) Fax: 202-226-2269
Rep. Sanford Bishop (D-2) Fax: 202-225-2203
Rep. Lynn Westmoreland (R-3) Fax: 202-225-3013
Rep. Hank Johnson (D-4) Fax: 202-226-0691
Rep. John Lewis (D-5) Fax: 202-225-0351
Rep. Thomas Price (R-6) Fax: 202-225-4656
Rep. John Linder (R-7) Fax: 202-225-4696
Rep. Jim Marshall (D-8) Fax: 202-225-2515
Rep. Nathan Deal (R-9) Fax: 202-225-5995
Rep. Paul Broun (R-10) Fax: 202-225-8272
Rep. Phil Gingrey (R-11) Fax: 202-225-2944
Rep. John Barrow (D-12) Fax: 202-225-3377
Rep. David Scott (D-13) Fax: 202-225-4628

Hawaii
Gov. Linda Lingle (R) 808-586-0034
State Legislature Links
Sen. Daniel K. Akaka (D) Fax: 202-224-2126
Sen. Daniel K. Inouye (D) Fax: 202-224-6747
Rep. Neil Abercrombie (D-1) Fax: 202-225-4580
Rep. Mazie Hirono (D-2) Fax: 202-225-4987

Idaho
Gov. Butch Otter (R) 208-334-2100
State Legislature Links
Sen. James Risch (R) Fax: 202-228-1067
Sen. Michael Crapo (R) Fax: 202-228-1375
Rep. Walt Minnick (D-1) Fax: 202-225-3029
Rep. Michael Simpson (R-2) Fax: 202-225-8216

Illinois
Gov. Pat Quinn (D) 217-782-0244
State Legislature Links
Sen. Dick Durbin (D) Fax: 202-228-0400
Sen. Roland Burris (D) Fax: 202-228-5417
Rep. Bobby Rush (D-1) Fax: 202-226-0333
Rep. Jesse Jackson, Jr. (D-2) Fax: 202-225-0899
Rep. Daniel Lipinski (D-3) Fax: 202-225-1012
Rep. Luis Gutirrez (D-4) Fax: 202-225-7810
Rep. Mike Quigley (D-5) Fax: 202-225-5603
Rep. Peter Roskam (R-6) Fax: 202-225-1166
Rep. Danny Davis (D-7) Fax: 202-225-5641
Rep. Melissa Bean (D-8) Fax: 202-225-7830
Rep. Janice Schakowsky (D-9) Fax: 202-226-6890
Rep. Mark Kirk (R-10) Fax: 202-225-0837
Rep. Deborah Halvorson (D-11) Fax: 202-225-3521
Rep. Jerry Costello (D-12) Fax: 202-225-0285
Rep. Judy Biggert (R-13) Fax: 202-225-9420
Rep. Bill Foster (D-14) Fax: 202-225-0697
Rep. Timothy Johnson (R-15) Fax: 202-226-0791
Rep. Donald Manzullo (R-16) Fax: 202-225-5284
Rep. Philip Hare (D-17) Fax: 202-225-5396
Rep. Aaron Schock (R-18) Fax: 202-225-9249
Rep. John Shimkus (R-19) Fax: 202-225-5880

Indiana
Gov. Mitch Daniels (R) 317-232-4567
State Legislature Links
Sen. Evan Bayh (D) Fax: (202) 228-1377
Sen. Richard G. Lugar (R) Fax: 202-228-0360
Rep. Peter Visclosky (D-1) Fax: 202-225-2493
Rep. Joe Donnelly (D-2) Fax: 202-225-6798
Rep. Mark Souder (R-3) Fax: 202-225-3479
Rep. Stephen Buyer (R-4) Fax: 202-225-2267
Rep. Dan Burton (R-5) Fax: 202-225-0016
Rep. Mike Pence (R-6) Fax: 202-225-3382
Rep. André Carson (D-7) Fax: 202-225-5633
Rep. Brad Ellsworth (D-8) Fax: 202-225-3284
Rep. Baron Hill (D-9) Fax: 202-226-6866

Iowa
Gov. Chet Culver (D) 515-281-5211
State Legislature Links
Sen. Chuck Grassley (R) Fax: 202-224-6020
Sen. Tom Harkin (D) Fax: 202-224-9369
Rep. Bruce Braley (D-1) Fax: 202-225-9129
Rep. David Loebsack (D-2) Fax: 202-226-0757
Rep. Leonard Boswell (D-3) Fax: 202-225-5608
Rep. Tom Latham (R-4) Fax: 202-225-3301
Rep. Steve King (R-5) Fax: 202-225-3193


Ohio
Gov. Ted Strickland (D) 614-466-3555
State Legislature Links
Sen. Sherrod Brown (D) Fax: 202-224-6519
Sen. George Voinovich (R) Fax: 202-228-1382
Rep. Steve Chabot (R-1) Fax: 202-225-3012
Rep. Jean Schmidt (R-2) Fax: 202-225-1992
Rep. Michael Turner (R-3) Fax: 202-226-1443
Rep. Jim Jordan (R-4) Fax: 202-226-0577
Rep. Bob Latta (R-5) Fax: 202-225-1985
Rep. Charlie Wilson (D-6) Fax: 202-225-5907
Rep. David Hobson (R-7) Fax: 202-225-1984
Rep. John Boehner (R-8) Fax: 202-225-0704
Rep. Marcy Kaptur (D-9) Fax: 202-225-7711
Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-10) Fax: 202-225-5745
Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-11) Fax: 202-225-1339
Rep. Pat Tiberi (R-12) Fax: 202-226-4523
Rep. Betty Sutton (D-13) Fax: 202-225-2266
Rep. Steven LaTourette (R-14) Fax: 202-225-3307
Rep. Deborah Pryce (R-15) Fax: 202-225-3529
Rep. Ralph Regula (R-16) Fax: 202-225-3059
Rep. Tim Ryan (D-17) Fax: 202-225-3719
Rep. Zack Space (D-18) Fax: 202-225-3394

Oklahoma
Gov. Brad Henry (D) Fax: 405-521-3353
State Legislature Links
Sen. James Inhofe (R) Fax: 202-228-0380
Sen. Tom Coburn (R) Fax: 202-224-6008
Rep. John Sullivan (R-1) Fax: 202 225-9187
Rep. Dan Boren (D-2) Fax: 202-225-3038
Rep. Frank Lucas (R-3) Fax: 202-225-8698
Rep. Tom Cole (R-4) Fax: 202-225-3512
Rep. Mary Fallin (R-5) Fax: 202-226-1463

Oregon
Gov. Ted Kulongoski (D) 503-378-4582
State Legislature Links
Sen. Jeff Merkley (D) Fax: 202-228-3997
Sen. Ron Wyden (D) Fax: 202-228-2717
Rep. David Wu (D-1) Fax: 202-225-9497
Rep. Greg Walden (R-2) Fax: 202-225-5774
Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-3) Fax: 202-225-8941
Rep. Peter DeFazio (D-4) Fax: 202-225-0032
Rep. Darlene Hooley (D-5) Fax: 202-225-5699

Pennsylvania
Gov. Ed Rendell (D) 717-787-2500
State Legislature Links
Sen. Robert Casey, Jr. (D) Fax: 202-228-0604
Sen. Arlen Specter (D) Fax: 202-228-1229
Rep. Robert Brady (D-1) Fax: 202-225-0088
Rep. Chaka Fattah (D-2) Fax: 202-225-5392
Rep. Kathy Dahlkemper (D-3) Fax: 202-225-3103
Rep. Jason Altmire (D-4) Fax: 202-226-2274
Rep. John Peterson (R-5) Fax: 202-225-5796
Rep. Jim Gerlach (R-6) Fax: 202-225-8440
Rep. Joe Sestak (D-7) Fax: 202-225-0280
Rep. Patrick Murphy (D-8) Fax: 202-225-9511
Rep. Bill Shuster (R-9) Fax: 202-225-2486
Rep. Chris Carney (D-10) Fax: 202-225-9594
Rep. Paul Kanjorski (D-11) Fax: 202-225-0764
Rep. John Murtha (D-12) Fax: 202-225-5709
Rep. Allyson Schwartz (D-13) Fax: 202-226-0611
Rep. Michael Doyle (D-14) Fax: 202-225-3084
Rep. Charlie Dent (R-15) Fax: 202-226-0778
Rep. Joseph Pitts (R-16) Fax: 202-225-2013
Rep. Tim Holden (D-17) Fax: 202-226-0996
Rep. Tim Murphy (R-18) Fax: 202-225-1844
Rep. Todd Platts (R-19) Fax: 202-226-1000

Rhode Island
Gov. Don Carcieri (R) 401-222-2080
State Legislature Links
Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse (D) Fax: 202-228-2853
Sen. Jack Reed (D) Fax: 202-224-4680
Rep. Patrick Kennedy (D-1) Fax: 202-225-3290
Rep. James Langevin (D-2) Fax: 202-225-5976

South Carolina
Gov. Mark Sanford (R) 803-734-2100
State Legislature Links
Sen. Jim DeMint (R) Fax: 202-228-5143
Sen. Lindsey Graham (R) Fax: 202-224-3808
Rep. Henry Brown (R-1) Fax: 202-225-3407
Rep. Joe Wilson (R-2) Fax: 202-225-2455
Rep. Gresham Barrett (R-3) Fax: 202-225-3216
Rep. Bob Inglis (R-4) Fax: 202-226-1177
Rep. John Spratt (D-5) Fax: 202-225-0464
Rep. James Clyburn (D-6) Fax: 202-225-2313

South Dakota
Gov. Mike Rounds (R) 605-773-3212
State Legislature Links
Sen. John Thune (R) Fax: 202-228-5429
Sen. Tim Johnson (D) Fax: 202-228-5765
Rep. Stephanie Herseth (D-At Large) Fax: 202-225-5823

Tennessee
Gov. Phil Bredesen (D) 615-741-2001
State Legislature Links
Sen. Bob Corker (R) Fax: 202-228-1264
Sen. Lamar Alexander (R) Fax: 202-228-3398
Rep. Phil Roe (R-1) Fax: 202-225-5714
Rep. John Duncan, Jr. (R-2) Fax: 202-225-6440
Rep. Zach Wamp (R-3) Fax: 202-225-3494
Rep. Lincoln Davis (D-4) Fax: 202-226-5172
Rep. Jim Cooper (D-5) Fax: 202-226-1035
Rep. Bart Gordon (D-6) Fax: 202-225-6887
Rep. Marsha Blackburn (R-7) Fax: 202-225-3004
Rep. John Tanner (D-8) Fax: 202-225-1765
Rep. Steve Cohen (D-9) Fax: 202-225-5663

Texas
Gov. Rick Perry (R) 512-463-2000
State Legislature Links
Sen. John Cornyn (R) Fax: 202-228-2856
Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison (R) Fax: 202-224-0776
Rep. Louis Gohmert (R-1) Fax: 202-225-5866
Rep. Ted Poe (R-2) Fax: 202-225-5547
Rep. Sam Johnson (R-3) Fax: 202-225-1485
Rep. Ralph Hall (R-4) Fax: 202-225-3332
Rep. Jeb Hensarling (R-5) Fax: 202-226-4888
Rep. Joe Barton (R-6) Fax: 202-225-3052
Rep. John Culberson (R-7) Fax: 202-225-4381
Rep. Kevin Brady (R-8) Fax: 202-225-5524
Rep. Al Green (D-9) Fax: 202-225-2947
Rep. Michael McCaul (R-10) Fax: 202-225-5955
Rep. Mike Conaway (R-11) Fax: 202-225-1783
Rep. Kay Granger (R-12) Fax: 202-225-5683
Rep. "Mac" Thornberry (R-13) Fax: 202-225-3486
Rep. Ron Paul (R-14) Fax: 202-226-6553
Rep. Ruben Hinojosa (D-15) Fax: 202-225-5688
Rep. Silvestre Reyes (D-16) Fax: 202-225-2016
Rep. Chet Edwards (D-17) Fax: 202-225-2234
Rep. Sheila Jackson-Lee (D-18) Fax: 202-225-3317
Rep. Randy Neugebauer (R-19) Fax: 202-225-9615
Rep. Charles Gonzalez (D-20) Fax: 202-225-1915
Rep. Lamar Smith (R-21) Fax: 202-225-8628
Rep. Pete Olson (R-22) Fax: 202-225-5241
Rep. Ciro Rodriguez (D-23) Fax: 202-225-2237
Rep. Kenny Marchant (R-24) Fax: 202-225-0074
Rep. Lloyd Doggett (D-25) Fax: 202-225-2947
Rep. Michael Burgess (R-26) Fax: 202-225-2919
Rep. Solomon Ortiz (D-27) Fax: 202-226-1134
Rep. Enrique Cuellar (D-28) Fax: 202-225-1641
Rep. Gene Green (D-29) Fax: 202-225-9903
Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D-30) Fax: 202-226-1477
Rep. John Carter (R-31) Fax: 202-225-5886
Rep. Pete Sessions (R-32) Fax: 202-225-5878

Utah
Gov. Jon Huntsman, Jr. (R) 801-538-1000
State Legislature Links
Sen. Robert F. Bennett (R) Fax: 202-228-1168
Sen. Orrin G. Hatch (R) Fax: 202-224-6331
Rep. Rob Bishop (R-1) Fax: 202-225-5857
Rep. Jim Matheson (D-2) Fax: 202-225-5638
Rep. Chris Cannon (R-3) Fax: 202-225-5629

Vermont
Gov. Jim Douglas (R) 802-828-3333
State Legislature Links
Sen. Bernie Sanders (I) Fax: 202-228-0776
Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D) Fax: 202-224-3479
Rep. Peter Welch (D-At Large) Fax: 202-225-6790

Virginia
Gov. Tim Kaine (D) 804-786-2211
State Legislature Links
Sen. Jim Webb (D) Fax: 202-228-6363
Sen. Mark Warner (D) Fax: 202-224-6295
Rep. Robert Wittman (R-1) Fax: 202-225-4382
Rep. Glen Nye (D-2) Fax: 202-225-4218
Rep. Robert Scott (D-3) Fax: 202-225-8354
Rep. Randy Forbes (R-4) Fax: 202-226-1170
Rep. Thomas Perriello (D-5) Fax: 202-225-5681
Rep. Bob Goodlatte (R-6) Fax: 202-225-9681
Rep. Eric Cantor (R-7) Fax: 202-225-0011
Rep. Jim Moran (D-8) Fax: 202-225-0017
Rep. Rick Boucher (D-9) Fax: 202-225-0442
Rep. Frank Wolf (R-10) Fax: 202-225-0437
Rep. Gerald Connolly (D-11) Fax: 202-225-3071

Washington
Gov. Christine Gregoire (D) 360-902-4111
State Legislature Links
Sen. Maria Cantwell (D) Fax: 202-228-0514
Sen. Patty Murray (D) Fax: 202-224-0238
Rep. Jay Inslee (D-1) Fax: 202-226-1606
Rep. Rick Larsen (D-2) Fax: 202-225-4420
Rep. Brian Baird (D-3) Fax: 202-225-3478
Rep. Doc Hastings (R-4) Fax: 202-225-3251
Rep. Cathy McMorris (R-5) Fax: 202-225-3392
Rep. Norman Dicks (D-6) Fax: 202-226-1176
Rep. Jim McDermott (D-7) Fax: 202-225-6197
Rep. Dave Reichert (R-8) Fax: 202-225-4282
Rep. Adam Smith (D-9) Fax: 202-225-5893

West Virginia
Gov. Joe Manchin III (D) 888-438-2731
State Legislature Links
Sen. Robert C. Byrd (D) Fax: 202-228-0002
Sen. John D. Rockefeller, IV (D) Fax: 202-224-7665
Rep. Alan Mollohan (D-1) Fax: 202-225-7564
Rep. Shelley Capito (R-2) Fax: 202-225-7856
Rep. Nick Rahall (D-3) Fax: 202-225-9061

Wisconsin
Gov. Jim Doyle (D) 608-266-1212
State Legislature Links
Sen. Russell D. Feingold (D) Fax: 202-224-2725
Sen. Herb Kohl (D) Fax: 202-224-9787
Rep. Paul Ryan (R-1) Fax: 202-225-3393
Rep. Tammy Baldwin (D-2) Fax: 202-225-6942
Rep. Ron Kind (D-3) Fax: 202-225-5739
Rep. Gwen Moore (D-4) Fax: 202-225-8135
Rep. James Sensenbrenner (R-5) Fax: 202-225-3190
Rep. Tom Petri (R-6) Fax: 202-225-2356
Rep. David Obey (D-7) Fax: 715-842-4488
Rep. Steve Kagan (D-8) Fax: 202-225-5729

Wyoming
Gov. Dave Freudenthal (D) 307-777-7434
State Legislature Links
Sen. Mike Enzi (R) Fax: 202-228-0359
Sen. John Barrasso (R) Fax: 202-224-1724
Rep. Barbara Cubin (R-At Large) Fax: 202-225-3057

Territories and Delegates:

American Samoa
Gov. Togiola Tulafono (D) 684-633-4116
Delegate Eni Faleomavaega (D-At Large) Fax: 202-225-8757

Washington, D.C.
DC City Council Links
Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-At Large) Fax 202-225-3002

Guam
Gov. Felix Camacho (R)
Territorial Legislature Links
Delegate Madeilene Bordallo (D-At Large) Fax: 202-226-0341

Northern Mariana Islands
Gov. Benigno Fital (Covenant) 670-664-1100
Territorial Legislature Links

Puerto Rico
Gov. Luis Fortuno (R) 787-721-7000
Territorial Legislature Links
Delegate Pedro Pierluisi (D-At Large) Fax: 202-225-2154

Virgin Islands
Gov. John de Jongh (D)
Territorial Legislature Links
Delegate Donna Christensen (D-At Large) Fax: 202-225-5517

Lawyer Representing Smoker Discrimination in the workforce

From smokersclub

This is what needs to start happening. People standing up to Lifestyle Discrimination, hiring a Lawyer and standing up for their rights. Enough fukin bullshit.

I Googled "Discrimination in the workplace smokers" and came up with this site.

http://www.cmht. com/investigatio n_smokers. php
Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll PLLC
1100 New York Avenue, N.W., Suite 500
Washington, D.C. 20005

Telephone: 888-240-0775 or 202-408-4600

Investigation Concerning Termination of Smokers And/Or Charging Smokers Higher Healthcare or Disability Premiums.

"In 30 states and the District of Columbia, state law makes it illegal for companies to impose smoking bans on their employees when they are off duty. In addition, the federal employee benefits law, ERISA, prevents employers from discriminating against and/or firing employees, here smokers, to interfere with the attainment of any right under a benefit plan, here the right to health benefits."

Public misled over fire-safe cigs

While dis article may be old, it's still worthy to take note Big Tobacco used to think their consumers wouldn't like fire-safe cigs when the idea first came up a few decades ago.

"While tobacco companies succeeded in developing "fire-safe" cigarettes, they consistently claimed smokers would find them unacceptable. In 1994, US tobacco giant RJ Reynolds Tobacco stated, "We do not know how to make a cigarette that exhibits reduced ignition propensity that is consumer acceptable...extensive consumer testing showed they are not marketable."


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Public misled over fire-safe cigarettes

The tobacco industry misled the public and legislators over cigarettes designed to pose less of a fire hazard, internal industry documents reveal. Manufacturers stated publicly that the cigarettes would not sell, even though their own research showed smokers could not tell them apart from regular cigarettes.

In all countries where data is available, cigarettes are the leading cause of fire deaths. In the US alone, a thousand people are killed each year in smoking-related fires, and a third of them are not the smoker responsible. At the beginning of January 2003, New York state will achieve a world first by introducing fire safety regulations for cigarettes to combat the problem.

Efforts to make cigarettes less likely to cause a fire began in the 1970s when the industry tested prototypes with different tobacco blends, fire-resistant additives and low-porosity paper that restricted the amount of oxygen reaching the burning tobacco. All the cigarettes were designed to go out if left unpuffed for a set time.

While tobacco companies succeeded in developing "fire-safe" cigarettes, they consistently claimed smokers would find them unacceptable. In 1994, US tobacco giant RJ Reynolds Tobacco stated, "We do not know how to make a cigarette that exhibits reduced ignition propensity that is consumer acceptable...extensive consumer testing showed they are not marketable."

Equally acceptable

But Andrew McGuire, director of the Trauma Foundation, a San Francisco-based organisation that campaigns to prevent accidental injuries, has uncovered internal papers that prove the industry could make fire-safe cigarettes that were acceptable to smokers as early as 1985. He and his team searched industry documents released as part of the 1998 Master Settlement Agreement between tobacco companies and the US government.

One report covered consumer tests carried out in 1993 by RJ Reynolds on cigarettes that had been modified with fire-resistant additives and used less porous paper to make them less of a fire hazard. The report concludes that consumers found no significant difference between them and regular cigarettes.

A 1987 document from tobacco company Philip Morris shows that a study into different types of fire-safe cigarette reached a similar conclusion, stating: "The cigarette models appear to be equally acceptable to smokers."

Product liability

McGuire believes a separate document reveals why companies were so reluctant to introduce the prototype cigarettes. A document from British American Tobacco dated 1983 cites "product liability reasons" for not proceeding with fire-safe cigarettes.

This suggests to McGuire that the industry feared that marketing fire-safe brands would be a tacit admission that earlier versions were less safe. This might expose them to law suits from people injured in fires caused by standard cigarettes.

A spokesman for Philip Morris said McGuire's study is "a very selective citing from a small number of documents". The company last year introduced a "low-ignition" paper on its "Merit" brand of cigarettes.

As New Scientist went to press, RJ Reynolds had failed to respond to questions on the matter. But the company's website implies that it blames careless smokers, not cigarettes, for fires: "Anything that burns and is handled in a careless manner represents a potential fire hazard."

McGuire rejects this defence. "What do you tell someone whose loved one was burned to death in a fire caused by a neighbour's cigarette?" he asks.

Back and forth

Philip Morris's spokesman told New Scientist that the company supports federal laws to make cigarettes less likely to cause fires.

But Peter Grannis of New York state's assembly, who has championed fire safety legislation, says the industry has used its political influence to set federal and state legislators against each other: "This issue has whipsawed back and forth from states to the feds for 18 years."

New York will unveil its fire safety regulations for cigarettes on 1 January 2003, and the industry will be given six months to comply. However, the state legislation may yet be trumped by a federal bill being considered by Congress. Known as the Stearns-Towns bill, it has been criticised for being vague about when new measures should be introduced. The co-sponsors of the bill have received over $200,000 from the tobacco industry.

Grannis says the industry is concerned about the New York legislation. "How can they sell a cigarette that could save lives in New York, but not sell it in New Jersey?" he asks.

Journal reference: Tobacco Control (vol 11, p 346)

American Indians were the first to use tobacco

When did people start smoking tobacco?

Tobacco was smoked in the Americas long before its organized cultivation began somewhere around 5000 to 3000 BC. Tobacco use was ceremonial and ritualistic for the natives with the leaf not only being smoked, but also chewed, drunk, taken as snuff and even given as enema. Tobacco was considered as a means of communicating with the supernatural world and was also believed to have medicinal properties. Mayans considered it a divine plant and many Mayan gods are depicted smoking. The name tobacco came from a misunderstanding of the Spaniards who thought the dried leaves were called tobacco when the indigenous name tabaco actually meant the tube or pipe in which the natives smoked the leaves. Tobacco was introduced in the court of Catherine de Medici in 1560 by Jean Nicot. The word nicotine was coined.

How did tobacco spread to the rest of the world?


Following the 'discovery' of America by Columbus in 1492, tobacco smoking reached Europe from where it spread to the rest of the world. From Europe, smoking spread to the Ottoman empire and from there to Asia and Africa. Arabs took to tobacco in the form of hookah, which spread throughout Persia (Iran) and into India and then into China, south-east Asia and Africa by the end of the 17th century. By the mid 19th century, smoking tobacco had become prevalent throughout the world.

Why did tobacco become so popular?

When tobacco came to Europe it was believed to have many therapeutic properties, but was just as popular for the general sense of well being and feeling of comfort and ease it gave. In the late 16th century, a Spanish doctor claimed that tobacco alleviated hunger, acted as a relaxant and a painkiller and was even a cure for cancer. It was also believed to help treat syphilis which was spreading rapidly. However, it was the perception of tobacco as an elite and fashionable past time indulged in by the aristocrats and rulers that helped it spread faster. Tobacco consumption changed from just pipe smoking to cigars, snuff and chewing.

Why was tobacco banned in many places?

Ottoman Sultan Murad IV (1623-40) is believed to be among the first to ban smoking as it was seen as a threat to morals and health. In China, the Chongzen emperor (1627-44) of the Ming dynasty issued an edict prohibiting tobacco smoking. The following Manchu dynasty emperor also continued this prohibition. In 1634, the Patriarch of Moscow forbade the sale of tobacco and those caught smoking had their nostrils slit or were whipped severely. During the same time, papal bulls were issued against smoking and snuff. However, over time the church created a tobacco monopoly and forbade the distribution of anti-tobacco literature in its parishes. In England, James I condemned tobacco smoking calling it a barbarous custom. However, as prohibition was not successful in suppressing smoking, rulers turned to controlling the tobacco trade through state monopoly.

How did cigarettes become the dominant form of tobacco consumption?

Initially, cigarettes were a luxury item meant only for the urban elite of Europe as they were expensive and handmade. The cigarette rolling Bonsack machine, patented by the American James Bonsack in 1880 made it possible to mass-produce inexpensive cigarettes. American industrialist James Buchanan Duke founded the America Tobacco company (ATC) in 1890 and used this machine to manufacture cigarettes. In 1883, Henry Wills started using the machine in Britain. Cigarettes became big business with large companies churning out hundreds of billions of cigarettes every year. China National Tobacco Corporation became the largest cigarette company in the world. There was a public outcry as minor boys started taking to smoking. However, the two World Wars stemmed criticism of young men smoking as soldiers found it easier to smoke cigarettes than pipes in the trenches and there was official recognition of tobacco helping to relieve the physical and psychological stress of war. By the mid 20th century smoking became an acceptable social behaviour.

How did public opinion turn against cigarettes and smoking again?

In 1958, the British medical journal Lancet for the first time raised fears about the effect of smoking on health. By 1960, the British Medical Journal too published evidence of a link between lung cancer and smoking. In 1964 the US Surgeon General announced that smoking caused lung cancer and soon a law made it mandatory to carry the warning against smoking on every cigarette packet.

In UK, the government banned cigarette advertisements on television and by 1970 the US followed suit. Soon a series of restrictions on smoking followed. The 1990s saw a slew of restrictions on smoking and simultaneously the tobacco companies had several law suits filed against them. Finally, in 1998 tobacco company executives testified before the US Congress that nicotine is addictive and that smoking could cause lung cancer.

(Source: September 29, 2008 - An article posted in the India Times News)